Distance Learning in Connecticut High Schools: Purposeless leads to depression and anxiety

By General Education Advice

“I wake up around 10.  I post something in discussion boards to check-in and get points.  I do my assignments and I’m done around 11:30-12.  Sometimes I do a bit more but I do nothing on the weekends.” So said “Ryan”, one of my students from Lyme-Old Lyme.

“What do you do the rest of the time?”

“Mostly video-games with head-sets talking to my friends, NetFlix, and…. just hanging out.”

I’ve had similar conversations with students from East Lyme, Old Saybrook, Valley Regional, Guilford and Daniel Hand, among other high schools.

I noticed in these conversations that the students were not gleeful.  They were bored.  Boredom stems from purposelessness.  And purposelessness leads to depression and anxiety.

Several parents have noted that their children have seemed eager for our meetings and in far better moods after our meetings.  I am certain that part of the reason is that they feel purposeful when learning.

We have had a shock to the system.  The most common response to such disruptions is paralysis.  That’s understandable.  But now the shock has been absorbed.  Time to get moving.  For students, life really does goes on.  They will be graduating high school, most will head on to higher education, and presumably most all will be striving to become financially independent.

They have an opportunity now to use this time effectively.  If they do, they will feel invigorated. They will have absorbed a blow and come out stronger.

Or they can play video games, create Tik-Toks, endless SnapChats….

We can help you help your children.

 

 

Daryl Capuano

CEO, The Learning Consultants and Connecticut’s top private education consultant
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